Weightlifting Movements

Bodyweight Movements | Endurance Movements | Weightlifting Movements

Back Squat

The Back Squat begins with the barbell in the back rack position starting with the competitor’s hips and legs locked out in extension. To complete a repetition of a back squat the competitor must maintain the barbell while reaching squat depth (hip crease below parallel) and continuing back to a standing position with hips, legs at extension. Unless specified, a back squat may come from a squat rack.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition for Back Squat may Include: failing to have either hips and/or legs at full extension at the end of the movement; failing to reach squat depth during the movement.


Bench Press

The Bench Press requires a racked barbell and bench for the Competitor. The movement requires that the competitors feet remain on the floor, and shoulders and buttock remain on the bench throughout the movement. The Competitor will un-rack the barbell with arms at full extension, grip shoulder-width apart, and lower the barbell to their chest and proceed to press it back to arms at full extension. Competitors may use a spotter to assist in un-racking the barbell, but the spotter must not touch the barbell prior to the competitor lowering it at the beginning of a repetition.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted rep include: A spotter touching the barbell at any point after un-racking the barbell prior to it being lowered to initiate a repetition; if the competitor fails to press the barbell out to full extension of their arms; if the competitors feet, buttock or shoulders lift up during the lift at any time.


Clean

The Clean is a barbell movement requiring the competitor to bring the bar from the ground to a front rack position, with the legs at full extension while the elbows reach a point in front of the barbell. The barbell must start on the ground for each repetition, and the competitor can achieve a front rack position by catching the load in either a power (partial squat, or full squat movement). A repetition will be counted once the barbell reaches the position described and is stable.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted rep include: pausing at the hips (hang position) before performing the ‘clean’ portion of the movement; the weight not clearly stabilized in the front-rack position; and finally, hips or knees are not clearly locked out when the weight is received in the front rack at the completion of the movement.


Clean and Jerk

The Clean and Jerk is a barbell movement requiring the competitor to bring the bar from the ground to a front rack position, followed by a shoulder to overhead press, or jerk to a stabilized overhead position with the legs and arms at full extension (elbows, knees, and hips at lock-out). The barbell must start on the ground for each repetition, and the competitor can achieve a front rack position by catching the load in either a power (partial squat, or full squat movement. The athlete can bring the load from shoulder to overhead in any way they wish with a strict press, push press, push jerk, or split jerk. A repetition will be counted once the barbell reaches clear stabilization overhead.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted rep include: repetition beginning with the bar on the ground; pausing at the hips (hang position) before performing the ‘clean’ portion of the movement; the competitor not returning their feet underneath them upon completion of the overhead lockout; the weight not clearly locked out in the overhead position; and finally, if the arms, hips or knees are not clearly locked out when the weight is overhead at the completion of the movement.


Deadlift

The Deadlift starts with a loaded barbell resting on the ground. The competitor’s feet must be hip-width apart, hands gripping the barbell outside their knees. The competitor will lift the weight from the ground, extending their hips and legs, with the shoulders back, behind the barbell (as opposed to slouched, in front of the barbell). If performing consecutive repetitions the competitor may not forcefully return the barbell to the ground as to “bounce” the weight into the start of the next repetition.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition for Deadlift include: not reaching full extension of hips and legs; not extending to achieve shoulders behind the barbell; bouncing the barbell into a consecutive repetition; or establishing a foot placement wider than the competitors grip; or placing the arms and feet in any way other than required.


Dumbbell Snatch

The Dumbbell Snatch will consist of the competitor moving a single dumbbell from the ground to over their head in a single, continuous movement. The completion of the repetition will be counted when the competitor’s legs, hips, and arms are at full extension with the dumbbell clearly stabilized above their head. The competitor may switch hands as the dumbbell descends towards the ground, but only when the dumbbell is below eye-level. Each repetition must start with the dumbbell fully in contact with the ground. Unless specified otherwise each repetition must alternate arms.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition may include: the competitor did not fully extend either their legs, hips, and/or arms; the dumbbell does not fully contact the ground prior to initiating a repetition, (i.e. if only one head of the dumbbell touches the ground a repetition will not be counted); the competitor does not show stabilization of the dumbbell overhead at the completion of the repetition; if the movement is non-continuous, i.e. if the dumbbell is brought to the shoulder and then pressed overhead.


Front Squat

The Front Squat begins with the barbell in the front rack position starting with the competitor’s hips and legs locked out in extension. To complete a repetition of a front squat the competitor must maintain the barbell in the front rack position while reaching squat depth (hip crease below parallel) and continuing back to a standing position with hips, legs at extension. Unless specified, a front squat repetition starts with the bar resting on the ground.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition for Front Squat may Include: failing to have either hips and/or legs at full extension at the end of the movement; failing to reach squat depth during the movement.


Hang Clean

The Hang Clean will begin with a barbell loaded to the required weight. The competitor will start the movement by first deadlifting the barbell, standing the weight up and reaching full leg and hip extension, and shoulders behind the barbell. After achieving a deadlift, the competitor may lower the bar to any point above knee level and begin initiating “hang” cleans, receiving the clean in either a power, muscle, or squat variety. Completion of a repetition will be when the barbell reaches the front rack position, at the shoulder level, where the competitor’s elbows are in front of the barbell, and legs and hips are at full extension. Additionally, the competitor must demonstrate control over the movement, especially before dropping the weight at the conclusion of a set of repetitions. At the beginning of each set of repetitions the competitor must start with a deadlift as outlined above. If performing consecutive repetitions (in “unbroken” fashion) then performing the deadlift portion of the movement is not required.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition for a Hang Clean may include: failing to complete a deadlift at the beginning of a set of repetitions as outlined above; failing to achieve stability in a front rack position (shoulder level) by means of either not getting their elbows in front of the barbell, not reaching full extension of legs or hips, and/or otherwise not demonstrating control of the movement.


Hang Snatch

The Hang Snatch will begin with a barbell loaded to the required weight. The competitor will start the movement by first deadlifting the barbell, standing the weight up and reaching full leg and hip extension, and shoulders behind the barbell. After achieving a deadlift, the competitor may lower the bar to any point above knee level and begin initiating “hang” snatches,finishing with the barbell locked and pressed out overhead, with hips and legs at extension. Furthermore, the competitor will demonstrate control of the weight above their head. If specified, the competitor must receive the weight in either a squat or power position. If power position is specified, the competitor may additional opt to catch it in a “muscle” position. A “power” position is specified as catching the weight in a partial squat. If a “squat” snatch is specified, then the competitor must either catch the weight at squat depth or receive the weight and immediately – without pausing – reach squat depth before standing the bar up and completing the movement. At the beginning of each set of repetitions the competitor must start with a deadlift as outlined above. If performing consecutive repetitions (in “unbroken” fashion) then performing the deadlift portion of the movement is not required.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition for Hang Snatch may include: not receiving the barbell in the required stance; pausing at any position between the barbell between hip and knee level to where it is pressed out overhead; if a finishing position where the competitor did not fully extend either legs, hips, or press out with their arms; or if there is no demonstration of control at the completion of the movement.


Overhead Squat

The Overhead Squat begins with the barbell locked (pressed) out in the overhead position with the competitor’s hips and legs also locked out in extension. The competitor may reach the overhead, locked out position from a variety of manner unless otherwise specified by the specific competition workout; options for reaching lockout may include: snatch, or clean and jerk the weight overhead, any shoulder to overhead movement initiated whether starting from another barbell movement or from a weightlifting rack. To complete a repetition of an overhead squat the competitor must maintain the barbell overhead while reaching squat depth (hip crease below parallel) and continuing back to a standing position with hips, legs at extension with the barbell pressed overhead demonstrating control. The competitor must start the movement with the barbell pressed overhead, and hips and legs at full extension unless otherwise stated.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition for Overhead Squat may Include: not utilizing the correct starting position as decided by the specific competition workout ruling; failing to demonstrate control of the barbell overhead at the end of a repetition; failing to have either hips and/or legs at full extension at the end of the movement; failing to reach squat depth during the movement.


Overhead Walking Lunge

The Overhead Walking Lunge requires a specified implement to be pressed over the competitors head while performing a walking lunge. The competitor must maintain the implement overhead until reaching incremental checkpoints or the finish of a specific distance to complete the required workload. The lunge requires the competitor to step forward with the trailing leg touching the knee to the ground. Any step performed that does not allow said knee to contact the ground is considered a shuffle step which is not allowed. In order to complete a distance, the athlete must perform a lunge and when stepping up out of the movement both heels must pass the distance marker.

Please note: the implement must be overhead at all times during the lunge movement and must not come into contact with the competitors head.

Common faults for Overhead Walking Lunge that may result in a non-counted repetition may include: not maintaining the implement overhead during the movement; performing a shuffle step instead of lunge; not returning to the previously completed marker after an error; failing to touch the trailing knee to the ground; not completing a distance by failing to step both heels beyond the distance marker.


Push Press

The Push Press may be completed with a Dumbbell or Barbell. In order to complete a repetition of a Push Press the competitor must bring their implement(s) to the front rack position. From here, the competitor may use their legs to generate force to help press their implement(s) above their head. A completed repetition requires that the competitors arm(s) and legs and hips are at full extension with the implement(s) locked out over the crown of their head.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition include: not starting a repetition from the front-rack position; not bringing legs, hips to full extension; not locking the implement(s) above the crown of their head to conclude a repetition.


Single-Arm Dumbbell Overhead Squat

The Single-Arm Dumbbell Overhead Squat will start with the competitor performing a squat with a dumbbell stabilized above their head. The competitor will begin by raising the dumbbell above their head however they desire, fully extending the arm supporting the dumbbell. The arm not supporting the dumbbell must not touch the competitors legs at any time. The completion of the repetition will be counted when the competitor reaches squat depth with their knees reaching a depth below their hip crease, and then return to the starting position with hips and legs at full extension. The Dumbbell must be supported in the overhead position at all times during a repetition or it will not be counted.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition may include: the competitor did not fully extend either their legs, hips, and/or arms at the beginning and completion of each repetition; the competitor does not show stabilization of the dumbbell overhead throughout the movement; if the movement competitor does not reach full squat depth during a repetition.


Single-Arm Dumbbell Front Squat

The Single-Arm Dumbbell Front Squat will start with the competitor performing a squat with a dumbbell stabilized in the front rack position, resting on the specified shoulder side. The competitor will begin by supporting the dumbbell in the front rack position. The arm not supporting the dumbbell must not touch the competitors legs at any time. The completion of the repetition will be counted when the competitor reaches squat depth with their knees reaching a depth below their hip crease, and then return to the starting position with hips and legs at full extension. The Dumbbell must be supported in the front-rack position at all times during a repetition or it will not be counted.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition may include: the competitor did not fully extend either their legs, hips, and/or arms at the beginning and completion of each repetition; the competitor does not maintain stabilization of the dumbbell throughout the movement and it leaves the front-rack; if the movement competitor does not reach full squat depth during a repetition.


Snatch

The Snatch is an Olympic weightlifting movement that starts with the barbell resting on the ground. The Competitor will lift the barbell from ground to overhead in one swift motion, extending the legs and hips to generate the motion, and finishing with the barbell locked and pressed out overhead, with hips and legs at extension. Furthermore, the competitor will demonstrate control of the weight above their head. If specified, the competitor must receive the weight in either a squat or power position. If power position is specified, the competitor may additional opt to catch it in a “muscle” position. A “power” position is specified as catching the weight in a partial squat. If a “squat” snatch is specified, then the competitor must either catch the weight at squat depth or receive the weight and immediately – without pausing – reach squat depth before standing the bar up and completing the movement.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition for the Snatch may include: not receiving the barbell in the required stance; pausing at any position between the barbell starting on the ground to where it is pressed out overhead; if a finishing position where the competitor did not fully extend either legs, hips, or press out with their arms; or if there is no demonstration of control at the completion of the movement.


Squat Clean Thruster

The Squat Clean Thruster begins with a barbell loaded to the required weight. The Competitor starts the movement by performing a squat clean – achieving the barbell in the front rack position while reaching squat depth: hip crease below knee level – and proceeding to complete a thruster – pressing the barbell overhead with legs, hips, and arms at full extension – as they stand from the bottom of the squat which they achieved from the clean. Each repetition must start with the barbell resting on the floor. The competitor may not pause at any point during the movement, for example: they may not pause as they come out of the squat before proceeding to press the bar overhead. If there is more than a single repetition required, the competitor may choose “touch-and-go” repetitions where they lower the barbell to the ground and immediately begin the next repetition.

Common faults that may result in a non-counted repetition for a Squat Clean Thruster may include: the repetition fails to begin with the barbell resting on the ground; the competitor doesn’t reach squat depth (hip crease below knee-level) during the squat clean portion of the movement; if the competitor fails to extend either the hips, legs, or arms during the press when completing the thruster portion of the movement; if the competitor pauses during any portion of the movement between standing out of the squat and pressing the barbell overhead.


Thruster

The thruster starts with the loaded barbell on the ground and the competitor bringing it to a front rack position. From the front rack position the competitor will complete a front squat and, without pause, immediately followed by a press overhead. In order for a rep to be counted the competitor must clearly reach full depth in their squat (with hip crease beneath knees) followed by a full lockout with the bar pressed, and stabilized overhead.

Common faults that may count as a non-counted rep include: not reaching full depth on the squat portion of the movement; elbows remaining bent during the press, not reaching full lock-out; the barbell being viewed as in front of the body at the height of the press, as opposed to being clearly over-head and stabilized. At no time will the barbell be allowed to be racked, if repetitions are not continuous then every time the athlete starts a new set the barbell must be picked up from the ground.


Wall Ball

A Wall Ball Repetition will be counted with the competitor first holding the Ball. The competitor will then complete a squat while holding the ball, bringing the crease of their hip beneath the level of their knees. Next, the competitor will stand up out of the squat position and proceed to toss the ball at their respective target height. The competitor may choose to then catch the ball and do as many consecutive repetitions as they desire. If the competitor chooses to let the ball to the ground in between repetitions, the ball must come to a rest on the floor (it may not be bouncing) before the athlete may pick it up and begin completing additional repetitions. Advanced Men: 20 lb ball to a 10 ft target; Advanced Women: 14 lb ball to a 9 ft target. Intermediate Men: 14 lb ball to a 10 ft target; Intermediate Women 10 lb ball to a 9 ft target.

Common faults of a Wall Ball that may result in a non-counted repetition may include: not using the required weight of a wall ball; not using the correct target height; not contacting the correct target height with a repetition either on accident or purposefully; if the competitor does not achieve a full squat during a repetition; if the ball is dropped and picked up prior to the ball coming to a rest on the floor.